Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Kisser on Sun Mar 27, 2011 4:14 am

That was very interesting
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Sun Mar 27, 2011 5:29 am

Just letting anyone know that there is no safe place in the planet, if you want safe try going into space where there is millions of times more radiation coming from the sun than the one you see in Japan right now. This is the main reason why there is no way for us to go to planets like Mars.

Another thing i want to point out is. That reactor number three is the one with the MOX fuel, this is the fuel that contains the most dangerous radioactive element know to men, more known as plutonium (Edit: i think I'm wrong here, maybe is uranium). Currently there is no way to protect the body against it, ones you in hail you have a couple of weeks or days to live before you end up dead, another thing i want to add is that it also depends on how much of the radiative element you in hail, small doses can lead to death in a few months, and larger ones can lead to death immediately after inhalation.

All we can do is pray that this does not come to this, or else everyone will die.

Al thought stuff like this appears on the bible, that in the end times stuff like this would happen. To me as a Christian it seem like the end is starting, and that more things will happen from here and on. Well i just wanted to point that out, so if anyone does get angry at me for adding that, please keep your comments to your self, as i don't need them, or don't really want to hear them.

I still have hope that everything will get better.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Kisser on Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:39 am

Gotta have faith...
But what do you mean everyone will die?
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:44 am

Not gonna knock you for your beliefs.

The fuel in reactor 3 is the most dangerous because it contains both Plutonium and Uranium. Which is why that reactor is such an issue. It's getting hotter than the others because of it.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Kisser on Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:51 am

^^But if it, explodes, will we all die?
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:01 am

Kisser wrote:Gotta have faith...
But what do you mean everyone will die?

Well everyone will die in the end of times, the people that will survive are the Christians that will be rapture into the sky by the lord him self, the ones that are left behind will have to suffer for all of the sins they have committed. (the people that are left behind still have a chance to be save, but they have to suffer, because if you don't have the mark of the beast you wont be able to do anything on this earth. Ex. buy and sell, and more. ones you receive the mark of the antichrist you wont be save (the beast number 666). No matter what you try you wont be save.) The point is dont get the number or you are screwed. If you really want to learn more about this you should go to your local Christian church, make sure they are teaching you the real deal, not some fake stuff like the Jehovah witness. You can tell who is telling you the truth by know only that Jesus died for your sins and that because of him you can be save. You have to accept him as your lord and savior.

Sporadic wrote:Not gonna knock you for your beliefs.

The fuel in reactor 3 is the most dangerous because it contains both Plutonium and Uranium. Which is why that reactor is such an issue. It's getting hotter than the others because of it.

Thank you for respecting my beliefs.

and yeah the MOX fuel is the most dangerous of them all.

Kisser wrote:^^But if it, explodes, will we all die?

It wont explode like a nuclear bomb, if it explodes it will be not as big as a real nuclear bomb.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by ArcAngel on Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:24 pm

I did know know this was going to turn into a religious thread. Everyone has there beliefs, lets keep it that way.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Sun Mar 27, 2011 7:14 pm

He said one thing about being a Christian. Was unaware that means this whole thread changed.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by -RR- on Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:10 am

dam i was wondering cant they put like fire hose with coolant on the reactors? culd work




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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:30 am

Nah the normal coolant is made of some shit I'd have to Google exactly what but it couldn't be done. They use water to cool them. And they were using a variety of other things to help cool them that weren't working. Ranging from sprinkler lines, fire trucks, concrete pumps, helicopter fly by and even seawater injection. But check it, the two weeks they used seawater they were pumping it in directly from their pits that constantly filled with water. Even with constant water flowing the nuclear rods in the reactor cores are so hot they evaporate the water before it even gets half way full. Plus, the reaction from using seawater to cool nuclear rods has a serious effect in the reactor.

In contact with water, hot boron carbide from BWR reactor control rods forms first boron oxide and methane, then boric acid. Boron may also be contributed to these reactions by the boric acid in an emergency coolant.

Zirconium from zircaloy, together with some other metals, reacts with water and produces zirconium dioxide and hydrogen. The production of hydrogen is a major danger in reactor accidents. The balance between oxidizing and reducing atmospheres and the proportion of water and hydrogen influences the formation of chemical compounds. Variations in the volatility of core materials influence the ratio of released elements. For instance, in an inert atmosphere, the silver-indium-cadmium alloy of control rods releases almost only cadmium. In the presence of water, the indium forms volatile indium oxide and indium hydroxide, which evaporate and form an aerosol of indium(III) oxide. The indium oxidation is inhibited by a hydrogen-rich atmosphere, resulting in lower indium releases. Caesium and iodine from the fission products react to produce volatile caesium iodide, which condenses as aerosols.

Only plus side to them now regaining control over fresh water injection is that freshwater is less corrosive than seawater.



MvRam: I'm not sure how I feel about your "No place safe in the world" opinion. Honestly, we've never been faced with such a nuclear disaster in all of our time using nuclear technology. Although, the prospect of 8 reactors worth of nuclear fuel ( yes I said 8 because of the rods in the common fuel pools, reactor cooling pools and in the reactors is about 8 reactors woth of nuclear fuel is active ) releasing doesn't sound promising for anyone. We don't know the extent of how serious this fallout would be. What I do know for sure is, if it happens you can kiss the western half of the United States goodbye. Could blow North, not promising for Russia. Although a directed path would most likely be the Pacific due to the jetstream. Like I said before, based on its geographical location Africa would be the safest place to be.

Also, people seem to be confusing the type of explosion that would happen at a plant if this did happen. Yes, there would be many massive explosions. But not like an atomic bomb would do. In fission weapons, a mass of fissile material (enriched uranium or plutonium) is assembled into a supercritical mass—the amount of material needed to start an exponentially growing nuclear chain reaction either by shooting one piece of sub-critical material into another (the "gun" method) or by compressing a sub-critical sphere of material using chemical explosives to many times its original density (the "implosion" method). The latter approach is considered more sophisticated than the former and only the latter approach can be used if the fissile material is plutonium.

Reactor cores releasing their fuel is much different and I could go on for hours about what goes on in a reactor during the meltdown. Best to just google it for yourselves. Understanding how everything first works can help you understand the situation a little better.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_reactor_technology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corium_%28nuclear_reactor%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plutonium
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uranium


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Mar 28, 2011 5:14 pm

They are using water with borax acid or something like that, i heard that is getting worther.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:13 pm

Update, 28-Mar-2011, 1700 UTC

Plutonium has been detected in soil at five locations around the Fukushima power plant.

TEPCO continued to remove highly radioactive water from inside reactor buildings, in an effort to enable engineers to restore the power station’s crippled cooling functions.

It is currently requiring 7 tons of water per hour at building / reactor 2, to stay even with the water that is evaporating / steam.

It has been revealed that a crane had fallen on to the fuel pool at Reactor 3 and is thought to have damaged the fuel rods there.
An incredible video of the Fukushima power plant from helicopter, taken 27-Mar-2011
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Kisser on Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:17 pm

I hear there was another earthquake around the same area? True or not?
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:24 pm

Kisser wrote:I hear there was another earthquake around the same area? True or not?

A hard aftershock.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:17 pm

Yeah 6.1 and there was danger of a new tsunami, i haven't checked the news about the tsunami.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Kisser on Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:09 am

Thats really bad, oh my gosh
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Tue Mar 29, 2011 2:33 am

I heard it was 6.5 from the earthquake tracker website.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Tue Mar 29, 2011 4:45 am

I think there was a small tsunami after the aftershock, i believe it was about 2 meters high.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Tue Mar 29, 2011 9:05 am

On Monday, 28 March 2011, Graham Andrew, Special Adviser to the IAEA Director General on Scientific and Technical Affairs, provided the following briefing on the current status of nuclear safety in Japan:

1. Current Situation

An earthquake of magnitude 6.5 occurred at 22:23 UTC on 27 March near the east coast of Honshu. NISA has confirmed that there have been no abnormal radiation readings at the Onagawa nuclear power plant, the closest to the epicentre, whose three units remain in cold shutdown since the earthquake of 11 March. As of 02:30 UTC today, there were no reports of any problems at nuclear plants in Japan related to the latest seismic event.

Overall at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, the situation is still very serious.

NISA informed the IEC that a meeting is planned with TEPCO to determine the origin and path of water in the turbine buildings of Units 1 to 4. As seen with the contaminated workers, high dose rates in the turbine buildings and contaminated water in the basements can hamper recovery efforts.

The pumping of contaminated water from the basement floor of Unit 1's turbine building into its main condenser is in progress, whereas at Unit 2 that process has not begun because the steam condenser is full. At Unit 3, the pumping of contaminated water and in particular where it is going, are under consideration. The issue is also being examined for Unit 4.

Temperatures measured at the feed water nozzle and at the bottom of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) continue to decrease slightly at Units 1 and 2, except the temperature at the feed water nozzle of Unit 1's RPV, which has slightly increased to 274 °C.

A positive development is that the pumping of fresh water into the reactor pressure vessel of Unit 1 is to switch from the use of fire trucks to temporary electrical pumps running on offsite power on 29 March. At Unit 2, this switch was carried out on 27 March, with a diesel generator as backup in case offsite power is interrupted. Fresh water is also being injected continuously into the reactor pressure vessel of Unit 3, albeit currently pumped by fire trucks. The switch to temporary electrical pumps for this unit is planned for today.

On 27 March at Unit 3, water was sprayed into the spent fuel pool using a concrete pump truck, and seawater was also pumped in through the spent fuel cooling system. It is planned to start pumping fresh water into the spent fuel pool tomorrow.

It is also planned to commence pumping freshwater into the spent fuel pool of Unit 4 from tomorrow.

Units 5 and 6 remain in cold shutdown.

At noon today in Japan, the three workers mentioned in previous briefings were released from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences where they had been kept under observation. The result of analyses performed indicates that the level of localised exposure received by two of them is between 2,000 and 3,000 millisievert (i.e. somewhat lower than the previous estimate of 2,000 to 6,000 millisievert).

2. Radiation Monitoring

On 27 March, deposition of iodine-131 was detected in 9 prefectures, and deposition of cesium-137 in 4 prefectures. The highest values were observed in the prefecture of Tochigi with 320 becquerel per square metre for iodine-131 and 73 becquerel per square metre for caesium-137. In the other prefectures where deposition of iodine-131 was reported, on 27 March, the range was from 6.4 to 110 becquerel per square metre. For caesium-137, the range was from 16 to 61 becquerel per square metre. In the Shinjyuku district of Tokyo, the daily deposition of iodine-131 on 27 March was 100 becquerel per square metre, while for caesium-137 it was 36 becquerel per square metre. No significant changes were reported in the 45 prefectures in gamma dose rates compared to yesterday.

Two IAEA teams are currently monitoring radiation levels and radioactivity in the environment in Japan. One team made gamma dose-rate measurements in the Tokyo and Chiba region at 3 locations. Gamma-dose rates measured ranged from 0.08 to 0.13 microsievert per hour, which is within or slightly above the background. The second team made additional measurements at distances of 30 to 46 km from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At these locations, the dose rates ranged from 0.5 to 3 microsievert per hour. At the same locations, results of beta-gamma contamination measurements ranged from 0.02 to 0.3 Megabecquerel per square metre.

New results from the marine monitoring stations 30 km off-shore were received for seawater samples taken on 26 March. The levels decreased at most of the locations. For iodine-131 the concentration results for four monitoring stations are between 6 to 18 becquerel per litre, and for caesium-137 between "below limit of detection" and 16 becquerel per litre. The dose rates measured on the sea surface remain relatively low between 0.04 and 0.1 microsievert per hour.

Samples collected on 26 March 330 metres east of the discharge point showed increasing concentrations. There were found to be 74,000 becquerel per litre for iodine-131, 12,000 becquerel per litre for caesium-137, and 12,000 becquerel per litre for caesium-134.

It is still too early to draw conclusions for expected concentrations in marine food, because the situation can change rapidly. Modelling results show an initial north-eastern transport of liquid releases from the damaged reactors.

Monitoring of iodine-131 and cesium-137 in drinking water is on-going. Iodine-131 has been monitored by the Japanese authorities in 2 of 10 samples taken in the Fukushima prefecture with values of 60 and 90 becquerel per litre. In the Ibaraki prefectures, iodine-131 was detected in 2 of 9 samples, the values were 40 and 90 becquerel per litre. The Japanese limits for the ingestion of drinking water by infants is 100 becquerel per litre.

As far as food contamination is concerned, samples reported from 26 to 27 March in six prefectures (Fukushima, Gunma, Ibaraki, Niigata, Tochigi and Yamagata) reported iodine-131 in asparagus, cabbage, celery, chive, cucumber, eggplant, leek, mushrooms, parsley, tomato, spinach and other leafy vegetables, strawberries and watermelon. One sample of hana wasabi taken on 24 March in Fukushima prefecture was above the regulation values set by the Japanese authorities. Caesium-137 was also measured above the regulation value in the same sample of hana wasabi, but in the remaining five prefectures, caesium-137 was not detected or the results were below regulation values.

The Joint FAO/IAEA Food Safety Assessment Team met with local government authorities in Fukushima on Sunday and discussed issues related to food contamination, including standards and sampling plan designs for radionuclides in food and the environment, radionuclide transfer from soil to plants, and mitigation strategies. The FAO/IAEA team also met with the local authority in Ibaraki prefecture today. They will have meetings with local government officials in Tochigi and Gunma tomorrow.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Tue Mar 29, 2011 5:57 pm

Update, 29-Mar-2011, 1630 UTC

Balancing act: Workers are facing the need to balance two urgent but difficult tasks — the coolant water injection and the removal of leaked radioactive water. “We have reduced the amount of injected water to a minimum given the reactor No. 2′s tendency to spew highly radioactive water,” said Hidehiko Nishiyama, a TEPCO spokesman. TEPCO has decreased the amount of fresh water being injected into its core, allowing the reactor vessel’s temperature to gradually rise — to 160.5 C as of 1 p.m. Tuesday.

The most serious problem is puddles of highly radioactive water found in the basements of turbine buildings of the number 1, 2 and 3 reactors. The source of leaks into the basements of the units is unknown, TEPCO says.

Workers are also trying to pump water out of the turbine houses of the No. 1 and No. 3 reactors.

“TEPCO is in an awful dilemma right now,” said Jim Walsh, an international security expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “One the one hand, they want to cool the reactor and keep the reactor cool, so they have to pour water in. If there is a leak in one of the containment vessels, that water keeps leaking out. So they have a problem where the more they try to cool it down, the greater the radiation hazard as that water leaks out from the plant.”
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Tue Mar 29, 2011 8:45 pm

Damn....


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Mar 30, 2011 4:19 am

IAEA Briefing on Fukushima Nuclear Accident (29 March 2011, 16:30 UTC)

On Tuesday, 29 March 2011, the IAEA provided the following briefing on the current status of nuclear safety in Japan:

1. Current Situation

The situation at the Fukushima Daiichi plant remains very serious.

Accumulated contaminated water was found in trenches located close to the turbine buildings of Units 1 to 3. Dose rates at the surface of this water were 0.4 millisieverts/hour for Unit 1 and over 1 000 millisieverts/hour for Unit 2 as of 18:30 UTC on 26 March. The Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan suggests that higher activity in the water discovered in the Unit 2 turbine building is supposed to be caused by the water, which has been in contact with molten fuel rods for a time and directly released into the turbine building via some, as yet unidentified path. An investigation is underway as to how the water accumulated in the trenches. Measurements could not be carried out at Unit 3 because of the presence of debris.

Fresh water has been continuously injected into the Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs) of Units 1, 2 and 3. From today at Unit 1, the pumping of fresh water through the feed-water line will no longer be performed by fire trucks but by electrical pumps with a diesel generator. The switch to the use of such pumps has already been made in Units 2 and 3. At Unit 3, the fresh water is being injected through the fire extinguisher line.

At Unit 1, there has been an increase in temperature at the feed-water nozzle of the RPV from 273.8 °C to 299 °C. The temperature at the bottom of the RPV remained stable at 135 °C. Temperatures at Unit 2 appear relatively stable at the same measurement points. At Unit 3, the temperature at the feed-water nozzle of the RPV is about 61.5 °C and 120.9 °C at the bottom of the RPV. The validity of the RPV temperature measurement at the feed water nozzle is still under investigation.

With the increase in temperature at Unit 1, there has been a corresponding increase in Drywell pressure. In the Drywell of Unit 2, the indicated pressure dropped slightly and is just above atmospheric.

It is planned to begin pumping fresh water into the spent fuel pool of Unit 4 today, on 29 March.

Units 5 and 6 remain in cold shutdown.

2. Radiation Monitoring

On 28 March, deposition of iodine-131 was detected in 12 prefectures, and deposition of cesium-137 in 9 prefectures. The highest values were observed in the prefecture of Fukushima with 23 000 becquerel per square metre for iodine-131 and 790 becquerel per square metre for caesium-137. In the other prefectures where deposition of iodine-131 was reported, the range was from 1.8 to 280 becquerel per square metre. For caesium-137, the range was from 5.5 to 52 becquerel per square metre. In the Shinjyuku district of Tokyo, the daily deposition of both iodine-131 and cesium-137 was below 50 becquerel per square metre. No significant changes were reported in the 45 prefectures in gamma dose rates compared to yesterday.

As of 28 March information on radioactivity in drinking water collected mainly from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare indicates that recommendations for restrictions based on I-131 concentration remain in place only in four locations in the prefecture of Fukushima. To date, no recommendations for restrictions have been made based on Cs-137. The Japanese limits for the ingestion of drinking water by infants is 100 becquerel per litre.

Five soil samples, collected at distances between 500 and 1 000 metres from the exhaust stack of Unit 1 and 2 of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant on 21 and 22 March, were analysed for plutonium-238 and for the sum of plutonium-239 and plutonium-240. (Due to analytical reasons, the isotopes plutonium-239 and plutonium-240 cannot be measured separately). Plutonium-238 was detected in 2 of the 5 samples, while plutonium-239/240 was detected in all samples as expected.

Concentrations reported for both, plutonium-238 and plutonium-239/240 are similar to those deposited in Japan as a result of the testing of nuclear weapons. The ratio of the concentrations of plutonium-238 and plutonium-239/240 in two of the samples indicate that very small amounts of plutonium might have been released during the Fukushima accident, but this requires to be further clarified.

As far as food contamination is concerned, 63 samples taken from 24 - 29 March, and reported on from 27 - 29 March, for various vegetables, fruit (strawberries), mushrooms, eggs, seafood and pasteurized milk in eight prefectures (Chiba, Fukushima, Gunma, Ibaraki, Miyagi, Niigata, Tochigi and Yamagata), stated that results for iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137 were either not detected or were below the regulation values set by the Japanese authorities.

The Joint FAO/IAEA Food Safety Assessment Team met with local government authorities in Ibaraki prefecture on Monday and provided advice related to contamination of food and the environment, including the mechanisms and persistence of such contamination, examples of remediation strategies, international standards and sampling plan designs and radionuclide transfer from soil to plants, particularly as related to rice production in the area.

Local government authorities briefed the FAO/IAEA Team on the extent of contamination in Ibaraki, the principle agricultural products affected, the main production areas and production methods (greenhouse, open-air) and levels of contamination found.

The FAO/IAEA team is also meeting with the local authorities in Tochigi prefecture today, and will meet with local government officials in Gunma tomorrow.

Sea Water Samples

No new results from the marine monitoring stations 30 km off-shore were reported for 27 or 28 March. However, new analyses in seawater 330 m east to the discharges point of NPP Units 1 - 4 were made available for 27 March. These concentrations show a significant decrease from 74 000 Becquerel per litre of iodine-131, 12 000 Becquerel per litre of cesium-137, and 12 000 Becquerel per litre of cesium-134 on 26 March to 11 000 Becquerel per litre of iodine-131 and 1 900 Becquerel per litre of cesium-137 on 27 March.

Sea water samples were also collected daily at a location 30 m from the common discharge point for Units 5 - 6. These results also show an increase in the radionuclide concentrations on 26 March. The sea water samples collected on March 27 show as well a decrease of the radionuclide concentration.
Fig. 1 and 2

It can be expected that the data will be quite variable in the near future depending on the discharge levels. In general, dilutions by ocean currents and into deeper waters as well decay of short lived radionuclides e.g. I-131 or I-132 will soon lead to lower values.

Marine Organisms

First analyses were reported in fish carried out by the National Research Institute of Fishery Research. 5 samples of fish were collected from the port of Choshi (Chiba prefecture) and 4 of 5 samples showed Cs-137 concentrations below limit of detection. In one sample Cs-137 was found with 3 Bq/kg (fresh weight) and it was reported that it was slightly above the limit of detection. This concentration is far below any concern for fish consumption.

It is still too early to draw conclusions for expected concentrations on marine food, because the situation may change rapidly, however, it is expected that the detected initial concentrations of seawater will soon drop to lower values by dilution and the levels in marine food will most likely not reach levels above given limits for consumption, (presuming that discharges of contaminated seawater from the reactor will not continue). It is not expected that fish or other marine food will be collected in a close area to the NPP Fukushima at the present situation. Some marine algae are known to accumulate in particular I-131 and Tc-99m. However, these values will soon be of no concern due to the short half-lives of the radionuclides mentioned.

Modelling Marine Dispersion

The Group SIROCCO of the Observatoire Midi-Pyrenées of the University of Toulouse, CNRS, is continuing to carry out model calculations. The model is based on an ocean circulation and current weather conditions and they results showed an initial north-eastern transport of liquid releases from the damaged reactors and the contaminated water would reach the northern monitored stations between 1 and 2 weeks later.

A model with tracer release directly in the sea show an along shore propagation in the southern direction and a northeast propagation moving away from the coast.
Fig. 3 and 4

With tracer release from atmospheric deposition, the propagation stretch offshore entering the Kuro-Shivo current in few days.

The first results are shown in Fig. 3 and 4. The data are converted into Bq/L by assuming arbitrary discharge or aerial release activities, respectively. The results should just be taken as indication of the dilution capacity and transport route of sea water.



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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Suri on Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:04 am

i heard that in the netherland for the 1st time they detected radioactivity but its really so low that it doesnt has any effects
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Mar 30, 2011 6:53 am



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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Suri on Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:16 am

LOOL omg
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

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