Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Wed Apr 06, 2011 3:20 pm

Sporadic wrote:If you kept up on it daily like everyone else it's not a lot of reading. Same would imply if you went into the Epic Screen Shot thread and said, "Wow I'm glad I have google images I'd hate to look at all of these."

He was ip banned when this thread was made XD
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Apr 06, 2011 4:26 pm

Dur, no shit Bato, you fucking think? Such a smart guy this week.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 06, 2011 5:41 pm





Updated 4:40 pm, April 5 2011. Radiation levels inside Units 1-3 said to be "immeasurable" and radiation monitors useless. Levels outside buildings reach 10 rems/hour in places.






Update, 06-Apr-2011, 1600 UTC

U.S. Democratic lawmaker Edward Markey told a House of Representatives hearing on the nuclear disaster that the NRC had told him the reactor core in No. 2 had melted through the vessel. In apparent ‘damage control’ over the statement, NRC Martin Virgilio, deputy executive director for reactor and preparedness programs, said “That’s not clear to us, nor is it clear to us that the reactor has penetrated the vessel”.

Fears of another hydrogen explosion is prompting an effort to inject nitrogen gas into the Reactor No.1. Nuclear fuel can split water molecules and create a hydrogen byproduct. Nitrogen, an inert gas, can offset this effect.

It has been reported that the water leak at Reactor No. 2 (at ‘the pit’) has been successfully plugged with liquid glass, or sodium silicate. Statements have been made though that there may be other outlets now that this one has been plugged. Time will tell.

U.S. government engineers sent to help with the situation, are concerned that the containment vessels which are now filling with water in an attempt to keep what’s left of the fuel rods cool, are vulnerable to the stresses of the water weight, and may possibly break open – especially should a large earthquake aftershock occur.

They are also highly concerned that fragments or particles of nuclear fuel from spent fuel pools above the reactors were blown “up to one mile from the units” when several of the buildings exploded weeks ago.

They also said in their report that the water flow in No. 1 “is severely restricted and likely blocked.” Inside the core itself, “there is likely no water level”. Similar problems exist in No. 2 and No. 3, although the blockage is probably less severe, the assessment says.

“They’ve got a lot of nasty things to negotiate in the future, and one missed step could make the situation much, much worse.”
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Apr 06, 2011 7:25 pm

It's a difficult process since we've never experienced a situation of this degree in the history of nuclear activity. Seems most of the step they make are making the situation worse.

U.S. Sees Array of New Threats at Japan’s Nuclear Plant
By JAMES GLANZ and WILLIAM J. BROAD Ny Times
Published: April 5, 2011

United States government engineers sent to help with the crisis in Japan are warning that the troubled nuclear plant there is facing a wide array of fresh threats that could persist indefinitely, and that in some cases are expected to increase as a result of the very measures being taken to keep the plant stable, according to a confidential assessment prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Among the new threats that were cited in the assessment, dated March 26, are the mounting stresses placed on the containment structures as they fill with radioactive cooling water, making them more vulnerable to rupture in one of the aftershocks rattling the site after the earthquake and tsunami of March 11. The document also cites the possibility of explosions inside the containment structures due to the release of hydrogen and oxygen from seawater pumped into the reactors, and offers new details on how semimolten fuel rods and salt buildup are impeding the flow of fresh water meant to cool the nuclear cores.

In recent days, workers have grappled with several side effects of the emergency measures taken to keep nuclear fuel at the plant from overheating, including leaks of radioactive water at the site and radiation burns to workers who step into the water. The assessment, as well as interviews with officials familiar with it, points to a new panoply of complex challenges that water creates for the safety of workers and the recovery and long-term stability of the reactors.

While the assessment does not speculate on the likelihood of new explosions or damage from an aftershock, either could lead to a breach of the containment structures in one or more of the crippled reactors, the last barriers that prevent a much more serious release of radiation from the nuclear core. If the fuel continues to heat and melt because of ineffective cooling, some nuclear experts say, that could also leave a radioactive mass that could stay molten for an extended period.

The document, which was obtained by The New York Times, provides a more detailed technical assessment than Japanese officials have provided of the conundrum facing the Japanese as they struggle to prevent more fuel from melting at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. But it appears to rely largely on data shared with American experts by the Japanese.

Among other problems, the document raises new questions about whether pouring water on nuclear fuel in the absence of functioning cooling systems can be sustained indefinitely. Experts have said the Japanese need to continue to keep the fuel cool for many months until the plant can be stabilized, but there is growing awareness that the risks of pumping water on the fuel present a whole new category of challenges that the nuclear industry is only beginning to comprehend.

The document also suggests that fragments or particles of nuclear fuel from spent fuel pools above the reactors were blown “up to one mile from the units,” and that pieces of highly radioactive material fell between two units and had to be “bulldozed over,” presumably to protect workers at the site. The ejection of nuclear material, which may have occurred during one of the earlier hydrogen explosions, may indicate more extensive damage to the extremely radioactive pools than previously disclosed.

David A. Lochbaum, a nuclear engineer who worked on the kinds of General Electric reactors used in Japan and now directs the nuclear safety project at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said that the welter of problems revealed in the document at three separate reactors made a successful outcome even more uncertain.

“I thought they were, not out of the woods, but at least at the edge of the woods,” said Mr. Lochbaum, who was not involved in preparing the document. “This paints a very different picture, and suggests that things are a lot worse. They could still have more damage in a big way if some of these things don’t work out for them.”

The steps recommended by the nuclear commission include injecting nitrogen, an inert gas, into the containment structures in an attempt to purge them of hydrogen and oxygen, which could combine to produce explosions. On Wednesday, the Tokyo Electric Power Company, which owns the plant, said it was preparing to take such a step and to inject nitrogen into one of the reactor containment vessels.

The document also recommends that engineers continue adding boron to cooling water to help prevent the cores from restarting the nuclear reaction, a process known as criticality.

Even so, the engineers who prepared the document do not believe that a resumption of criticality is an immediate likelihood, Neil Wilmshurst, vice president of the nuclear sector at the Electric Power Research Institute, said when contacted about the document. “I have seen no data to suggest that there is criticality ongoing,” said Mr. Wilmshurst, who was involved in the assessment.

The document was prepared for the commission’s Reactor Safety Team, which is assisting the Japanese government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company. It says it is based on the “most recent available data” from numerous Japanese and American organizations, including the electric power company, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, the United States Department of Energy, General Electric and the Electric Power Research Institute, an independent, nonprofit group.

The document contains detailed assessments of each of the plant’s six reactors along with recommendations for action. Nuclear experts familiar with the assessment said that it was regularly updated but that over all, the March 26 version closely reflected current thinking.

The assessment provides graphic new detail on the conditions of the damaged cores in reactors 1, 2 and 3. Because slumping fuel and salt from seawater that had been used as a coolant is probably blocking circulation pathways, the water flow in No. 1 “is severely restricted and likely blocked.” Inside the core itself, “there is likely no water level,” the assessment says, adding that as a result, “it is difficult to determine how much cooling is getting to the fuel.” Similar problems exist in No. 2 and No. 3, although the blockage is probably less severe, the assessment says.

Some of the salt may have been washed away in the past week with the switch from seawater to fresh water cooling, nuclear experts said.

A rise in the water level of the containment structures has often been depicted as a possible way to immerse and cool the fuel. The assessment, however, warns that “when flooding containment, consider the implications of water weight on seismic capability of containment.”

Experts in nuclear plant design say that this warning refers to the enormous stress put on the containment structures by the rising water. The more water in the structures, the more easily a large aftershock could rupture one of them.

Margaret Harding, a former reactor designer for General Electric, warned of aftershocks and said, “If I were in the Japanese’s shoes, I’d be very reluctant to have tons and tons of water sitting in a containment whose structural integrity hasn’t been checked since the earthquake.”

The N.R.C. document also expressed concern about the potential for a “hazardous atmosphere” in the concrete-and-steel containment structures because of the release of hydrogen and oxygen from the seawater in a highly radioactive environment.

Hydrogen explosions in the first few days of the disaster heavily damaged several reactor buildings and in one case may have damaged a containment structure. That hydrogen was produced by a mechanism involving the metal cladding of the nuclear fuel. The document urged that Japanese operators restore the ability to purge the structures of these gases and fill them with stable nitrogen gas, a capability lost after the quake and tsunami.

Nuclear experts say that radiation from the core of a reactor can split water molecules in two, releasing hydrogen. Mr. Wilmshurst said that since the March 26 document, engineers had calculated that the amount of hydrogen produced would be small. But Jay A. LaVerne, a physicist at Notre Dame, said that at least near the fuel rods, some hydrogen would in fact be produced, and could react with oxygen. “If so,” Mr. LaVerne said in an interview, “you have an explosive mixture being formed near the fuel rods.”

Nuclear engineers have warned in recent days that the pools outside the containment buildings that hold spent fuel rods could pose an even greater danger than the melted reactor cores. The pools, which sit atop the reactor buildings and are meant to keep spent fuel submerged in water, have lost their cooling systems.

The N.R.C. report suggests that the fuel pool of the No. 4 reactor suffered a hydrogen explosion early in the Japanese crisis and could have shed much radioactive material into the environment, what it calls “a major source term release.”

Experts worry about the fuel pools because explosions have torn away their roofs and exposed their radioactive contents. By contrast, reactors have strong containment vessels that stand a better chance of bottling up radiation from a meltdown of the fuel in the reactor core.

“Even the best juggler in the world can get too many balls up in the air,” Mr. Lochbaum said of the multiplicity of problems at the plant. “They’ve got a lot of nasty things to negotiate in the future, and one missed step could make the situation much, much worse.”


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Thu Apr 07, 2011 6:13 pm

Japan was hit with another earthquake this morning. 7.1 magnitude which prompted a tsunami advisory.

M 7.1, near the east coast of Honshu, Japan
Thursday, April 7, 2011 14:32:41 UTC Thursday, April 7, 2011 11:32:41 PM at epicenter Depth : 49.00 km (30.45 mi)

IAEA Update: New earthquake in Japan (7 April, 17:30 UTC)

The IAEA confirms that an earthquake occurred in Japan at 14:32 UTC 7 April. The IAEA International Seismic Safety Centre has rated it as a 7.1 magnitude, revised from an initial 7.4 magnitude. The epicenter of the earthquake was 20 km from the Onagawa nuclear power plant and approximately 120 km from the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear power plants.

The IAEA has been in contact with NISA and can confirm the status of the following nuclear facilities:

Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant
NISA confirms that no changes have been observed at the on-site radiation monitoring posts. The injection of water into the reactor pressure vessels of Units 1, 2 and 3 was not interrupted.

Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant
NISA confirms that no changes have been observed of the readings at the on-site radiation monitoring posts.

Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant
All reactors have been in cold shutdown since the 11 March earthquake.

NISA has confirmed that two out of the three lines supplying off-site power to the site were lost following the 7 April earthquake. Off-site power continues to be supplied through the third line.

Cooling of the spent fuel pool was temporarily lost, but has subsequently been restored.

No change has been observed in the readings from the on-site radiation monitoring post. The status of the plant is currently being checked.

Tokai Daini Nuclear Power Plant
Tokai Daini nuclear power plant remains in cold shutdown since the 11 March earthquake. No abnormality has been observed.

Higashidori Nuclear Power Plant
NISA has confirmed that the Higashidori NPP was shutdown and in a maintenance outage at the time of the 7 April earthquake. Off-site power has been lost. Emergency power supply to the site is operating. All the fuel had been removed from the reactor core and stored in the spent fuel pool. Cooling of the spent fuel pool is operational.

Tomari Nuclear Power Plant (in Hokkaido)
At the time of the 7 April earthquake Tomari Unit 1 and Unit 2 were in operation. Following the 7 April earthquake, the Hokkaido Electric Power Company reduced the generating power to 90% of capacity.

Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant
NISA confirms that Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant and uranium enrichment facility lost off-site power. Emergency power supply to the site is operating.

The IAEA will issue further information as soon as it becomes available.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Thu Apr 07, 2011 7:07 pm

Update, 07-Apr-2011, 1600 UTC

The Japanese government is considering expanding the evacuation zone around the Fukushima plant an additional 10 km. Currently the zone is a 20 km radius.

A Very strong earthquake (aftershock) of magnitude 7.1, just 75 miles away from Fukushima, has caused power outages in parts of Miyagi and Yamagata prefectures. Buildings in Tokyo swayed for about 1 minute. Fukushima workers have been evacuated.

After injecting nitrogen in Reactor No.1 to avoid a hydrogen explosion, the pressure inside has increased (makes sense), although certainly adding to the stresses of the structure.

Now that the water leak at an exit tunnel at Reactor No. 2 has been successfully plugged, the water inside is now rising underneath the complex and is now apparently just 3 feet from ground level. An overflow will cause a serious slow down to progress there.

The Japanese government is criticizing foreign media for reporting what it says have been misleading statements and over-reacting.

More than 100 South Korean schools have cancelled or shortened classes over fears that rain falling across the country may include radiation from Japan’s stricken nuclear plant.




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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Fri Apr 08, 2011 4:01 pm

Updated 3:15 pm, April 7, 2011. Earthquake knocks out power to some sections of northeast Japan. Rokkosho reprocessing plant and Higashidori reactor operating on emergency diesel generators.


"Interesting to note the strange but very bright blue light during the 7.1 earthquake as recorded from this camera. It may be a transformer explosion, but at that distance it seems awful bright…"



Also here a couple of high resolution images from the power plant.


http://pinktentacle.com/2011/04/high-resolution-photos-of-fukushima-daiichi/
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Fri Apr 08, 2011 5:57 pm

I know this is serious, but i had to lol at this comment on youtube

''YOU GUYS ALL STUPID, EVEN THE MEDIA. ITS GOKU USING SPIRIT BOMB DUUH''

@srs, wtf was it? u have any idea?
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Fri Apr 08, 2011 6:22 pm

The transformer.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Sat Apr 09, 2011 5:56 pm

Update, 08-Apr-2011, 1800 UTC

Toshiba, one of two Japanese nuclear reactor makers, said that it will take 10 years to remove the fuel rods from the four Fukushima reactors and to demolish the facilities there.

China and Russia are ‘expressing concern’ over the Japanese discharge of radioactive water into the ocean. (Not surprising – it’s their backyard…)

The towns around Fukushima Daiichi (12 mile exclusion zone) are dead zones with packs of abandoned pets hunting for food and herds of cattle wandering through the streets.




Update, 09-Apr-2011, 1600 UTC

To stop the leakage of highly contaminate radioactive water into the sea, TEPCO is installing an enclosure mechanism at seawater intake for the No. 2 reactor with steel sheets,’ while planning similar curtains for the Nos. 1, 3 and 4 reactors. The installation will help prevent contaminated water from spreading outside the plant’s bay.

TEPCO will fly a small unmanned helicopter to survey the plant, starting on Sunday depending on the weather, expecting it to capture images of damaged installations at the Nos. 1 to 4 reactors that workers cannot approach due to elevated levels of radiation.

About 60,000 tons of contaminated water lies in basements and trenches outside reactors No. 1, 2 and 3.

The water level rose in a trench at the No. 2 reactor, adding to concern the utility may have to speed up transfer of the radioactive fluid to a waste- treatment facility and tanks. The increase may be happening as the company stopped a leak of radioactive water near the unit on April 6.

Video footage of the tsunami as it hit the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant





Updated 6:00 pm, April 8, 2011. High radiation levels continue to plague area northwest of Fukushima Daiichi; concern grows over school openings over next two weeks.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Sun Apr 10, 2011 5:50 pm

Update, 10-Apr-2011, 1700 UTC

TEPCO still planning to move 60,000 tons of highly radioactive water to other storage tanks and holding areas, while they continue to dump other supposed ‘lesser’ radioactive water into the Pacific ocean.

They have begun using unmanned heavy equipment, remote-controlled power shovels and bulldozers to remove radioactive rubble to be stored in containers at the plan



April 10

Today's updates...

Unit 1 reactor temperatures and pressures has risen slightly since yesterday, but not enough to cause alarm.

Unit 2 & 3 reactor pressures and temperatures have continued to slowly drop. The two temperature readings on Unit 3 are 97 C at the upper feedwater nozzle and 107 C at the bottom of the reactor vessel (IAEA). In a few days, both should be below the 95 C criteria for cold shutdown condition. It will be interesting to see what occurs at that point.

Pressure in the unit 1 primary containment is above atmospheric, probably due to the nitrogen injection, which seems to be continuing. Pressures in the 2 & 3 containments remain at atmospheric.

200 tons of low activity waste water remains to be discharged to the sea. This will be finished today and the storage of waste waters from the turbine basements can resume. It is estimated that there is 50,000 tons of water that needs to be removed from the 4 basements. TEPCO says they do not have sufficient storage capacity for all of it, so they are pursuing bringing in as many portable tanks as necessary to store all of the waters.

Heavy, remote-controlled equipment has started to remove the debris from the three reactor buildings that had their external walls and roofs blown off by hydrogen explosions. All debris will be stored in safe locations at the plant site. Will the debris be sprayed with the previously reported suppressant resin and stored under plastic sheeting?

To continue one of yesterday's stories, I checked a listing of what may well be the only locations in Japan that continually monitor environmental radiation levels, for an indication of actual natural background levels. All of them are on the sea coasts of Japan. Why? Because they are all nuclear power stations. Geologically and geographically, inland levels are always higher than sea coast levels, plus nuclear plants are never built in urban areas where building materials would raise the detected levels. Regardless, six of the locations routinely have natural background levels above the “0.05-0.1” microsievert/hr range MEXT says is typical for Japan. The highest is 0.159 microsievert/hr level at Kashiwazaki Karira nuclear power station. Could yesterday's higher reported levels like the 0.42 microsievert/hr level reported at Fukushima City be typical background for them, and not due to the Fukushima emergency? Regardless, IAEA reports that gamma doses within the 30 km emergency radius around Daiichi are decreasing, and gamma doses measured daily in all 47 prefectures in Japan “tend to decrease”.

The Japanese Embassy in Beijing, has asked the Chinese to base their actions relative to Fukushima on “rationality and scientific findings”, and not on alleged public concerns about food contamination. Yesterday, China banned all foods imported from 11 Japanese Prefectures, including Tokyo which is more than 200 kilometers from Fukushima. China did this because of reports of trivial, non-health-threatening levels of contamination measured in foods from ten of the prefectures (except Fukushima prefecture, of course). Irrational fear of radiation is a prime example of the Hiroshima Syndrome at work in China.

NHK Japan reports what might be the first anti-nuclear demonstration since March 11 took place yesterday in Tokyo. Demonstrators demanded the immediate and permanent shutdown of all nuclear plants in Japan. This demonstration has been planned for over a week by anti-nuclear groups from 8 Prefectures across Japan. NHK estimates there were about 2,000 protestors...out of 127 million people. This reflects a CBC article more than 2 weeks ago where it was reported that most people in Hiroshima were quite unconcerned about what was happening at Fukushima. They felt all the hoopla about Fukushima was a terrible over-reaction. It took the CBC reporter three days to find what might be the only anti-nuclear group in Hiroshima, which had a membership of 20 citizens (out of 1.1 million). Interesting, eh?

Did TEPCO Compromise Safety for Money at Daiichi?

This morning, TEPCO released data showing the height of the tsunamic surge which occurred March 11, at both the Daiichi and Daini nuclear power stations. Numerous news sources inside and outside Japan, as well as some so-called experts, have stated that the Daiichi nuclear plants had not been upgraded to withstand earthquakes and tsunamis like Daini had been upgraded, in order for TEPCO to save money. The so-called “proof” is that Daini suffered little or no damage and no nuclear emergency, while the same quake/tsunami resulted in the Daiichi emergency. The new tsunami data places these statements in severe question.

As it turns out, the tsunamic surge at Daiichi was about 15 meters (over 46 feet) which swamped all power plant structures except the Reactor Buildings. Units 1 – 4 were subjected to an “inundation depth” of more than 15 ft. (whatever that means) These numbers come from high water marks left by the tsunami on Unit 2 reactor building, and a cell phone video made by one of the plant's workers. It seems the other two units at Daiichi were also inundated, but to a lesser degree, based on high water marks on their reactor buildings. This means that the enormous surge probably reached the emergency diesels of Units 5 & 6, even though the plant buildings are 10-15 feet above the shoreline. At least one of the Unit 5 & 6 diesels started and operated sufficiently to prevent a complete loss of power accident the two units. This was with a tsunamic surge the diesels were supposedly not built to survive...but one did! Now, moving to the Daini tsunamic surge...it is estimated that the Daini surge was between 6.5 and 7 meters. This was also greater than the “design criteria” of a slightly less than 6 meter surge (18 feet), but the power station has survived quite well. Regardless, the tsunami at Daini was roughly half as deep and several times less powerful than Daiichi's tsunamic surge. This makes the “TEPCO compromised Daiichi safety to save money” notions questionable, at best.

The new data also shows that even though the 10 nuclear plants at the two stations were not “designed” to survive such an extreme natural threat, their actual ability to survive was far, far greater than their “design criteria”. “Design criteria” are the minimum technical standards any builder must meet or exceed in order to be hired for the job. With nuclear plants, these minimum criteria are always exceeded...always! How much? Before Fukushima, it was mostly speculation, backed by sound engineering assumption. With Fukushima, mother nature has given us an inadvertent test of the exceptional capacity for nuclear plants to survive the worst mother nature can throw at them. Hopefully, there will be no entombment at Fukushima, so that experts can perform detailed analyses of the plant structures and find out the technical truth of Fukushima's level of safety. It took five years to discover that TMI was a severe meltdown, and thirty years for the NRC to admit it. With Japan's self-regulating nuclear community, we ought to get the truth much, much, much sooner.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:10 pm

Radiation monitoring

On 9th April, deposition of both iodine-131 and cesium-137 was detected in 5 and 6 prefectures respectively. The values reported for iodine-131 ranged from 7.8 to 650 becquerel per square metre and for cesium-137 from 3.3 to 370 becquerel per square metre. The highest deposition was reported for both, iodine-131 and cesium-137, in the prefecture of Ibaraki.

Gamma dose rates are measured daily in all 47 prefectures, the values tend to decrease. Dose rates are also reported daily for the Eastern part of the Fukushima prefecture, these values are decreasing as well. As of 9th April, the gamma dose rates, reported for distances of more than 30 km to Fukushima-Daiichi, ranged from 0.2 to 26 μSv/h.

In an additional monitoring programme, set up by MEXT in cooperation with local universities, measurements are made in 27 cities in 14 prefectures. As of 9th April, in 19 cities, the gamma dose rates were below 0.1 μSv/h. In 7 cities, gamma dose rates range from 0.13 to 0.21 μSv/h. In Fukushima City, a value of 0.46 μSv/h was observed. Typical normal background levels are in the range of 0.05 to 0.10 μSv/hr.

As of 7th April, iodine-131 and cesium-137 was detectable in drinking water in a few prefectures at levels far below those that would trigger recommendations for restrictions of drinking water. As of 7th April, one restriction for infants related to I-131 (100 Bq/l) is in place as a precautionary measure in only one village of the Fukushima prefecture.

On 9th April, the IAEA Team made measurements at 8 different locations in the Fukushima area at distances of 32 to 62 km, North and North West from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. At these locations, the dose rates ranged from 0.4 to 3.7 microsievert per hour. At the same locations, results of beta-gamma contamination measurements ranged from 0.03 to 0.19 Megabecquerel per square metre.

3. Marine Monitoring

As reported in the brief of 8th April TEPCO is conducting a programme for seawater (surface sampling) at a number of near-shore and off-shore monitoring locations as illustrated in Map 1



Until 3rd April a general decreasing trend was observed at the sampling points TEPCO 1 to TEPCO 4. After the discharge of contaminated water on 4th April, a temporary increase has been reported. On 10th April new data (7th April sampling day) for all TEPCO sampling points have been reported. At the near-shore sampling points TEPCO 1, TEPCO 3 and TEPCO 4 a further decrease with respect to the results for the sampling day 5th April, in the concentration of I-131 and Cs-137 have been reported. At the sampling point TEPCO 2 a further increase in the concentration of I-131 (from about 40 kBq/l on 6 April to about 150 kBq/l) and Cs-137 (from about 25 kBq/l on 6th April to about 65 kBq/l) was observed.

For the six sampling points TEPCO 5 to TEPCO 10th on April 7th the following has been reported: as TEPCO 5, TEPCO6 and TEPCO10 a further decrease of the levels of I-131 below 0.2 kBq/l and of Cs-137 below 0.1 kBq/l were measured.

At TEPCO7 an increase of the level of I-131 has been recorded. At TEPCO8 and TEPCO9 an increase in the levels of both I-131 and Cs-137 has been measured. The reading at TEPCO 9 is from about 0.07 kBq/l (6th April) to about 0.37 kBq/l for I-131 and from about 0.05 kBq/l to about 0.21 kBq/l for Cs-137.

MEXT Off-shore Monitoring Programme

As reported in the brief of 8th April MEXT initiated the off-shore monitoring program on 23rd March and subsequently points 9 and 10 added to the off-shore sampling scheme. On 4th April, MEXT added two sampling points to the north and west of sampling point 1. These are referred to as points A and B on the map below.

Map 2: MEXT Seawater Sampling Locations



On 10th April new data have been reported (7th April sampling day) for the sampling points MEXT6 and MEXT10. At MEXT6 sampling point an increase in I-131 (from about 18 Bq/l on 3rd April to about 57Bq/l) and Cs-137 (from about 10Bq/l on 3rd April to about 20 Bq/l) has been measured. At MEXT10 the level of I-131 remains about 35 Bq/l as on the 3rd of April; Cs-137 is no longer detectable.

No new data for the other sampling points have been reported at the date of 10th April.

4. IAEA Activities

The team of three agency experts in BWR technology will conclude their mission on Monday with meetings with NISA, MOFA(Ministry of Foreign Affairs), MEXT, Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC).

In addition to those reported in previous briefs the following countries have submitted monitoring data and/or links to national websites where data is available: USA, Czech Republic and Latvia.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:51 am

There going to be a test in San Onofre tomorrow.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Apr 11, 2011 2:50 pm

April 11

A new earthquake stuck central Japan last night, epicentered about 150 km. north of Tokyo, with a 6.6 rating on the Richter scale. This resulted in losing external power to Fukushima Daiichi for about 50 minutes before it was restored. As a result, cooling water flows to all three reactors of concern were interrupted, but resumed immediately upon restoration of power. Fukushima Daiichi is about 70 km. from the earthquake's epicenter. There is no word on whether or not the new earthquake is connected to the March 11 quake.

TEPCO reports their intentional, low-activity waste water discharge is completed. Also, the discharge of ~1400 tons of water from Unit 5 & 6 is completed. Before they begin turbine basement water transfers to the waste tank, TEPCO will verify if the tank is really empty. They need every last bit of storage volume they can get.

A massive barge/tanker will be shipped via sea from southern Japan to Fukushima Daiichi, later this week. This ultra-modern barge is bigger than the combined capacity of both US Navy barges supplying freshwater replenishment to the power complex. It will be used for storage of turbine basement waters, along with the tanks and condensers inside the plant.

TEPCO analyses of the off shore sampling points reveals that all I-131 contamination levels have dropped considerably at the four near-shore locations, since the last report two days ago. The six 15 km. sampling locations also reveal a considerable decrease, with three of the locations now at or below the 0.04 bq/cc health standard. The sealing of the infamous power cabling pit crack has certainly contributed to the decreases, but the efforts to contain the outflow of contamination by erecting barricades between the port/docking area and the sea have also been helpful.

MEXT's sampling locations 30 km. from the shore have shown also shown decreases in I-131 concentrations, but now 4 of the surface locations north and northeast of Fukushima Daiichi no longer show any I-131. In addition, eight of the 10 deep water samples are totally clean, but the two due south of Fukushima Daiichi continue to show I-131 levels above the health standard.

Even with the 50 minute interruption of cooling flows, the temperature and pressure readouts of Unit 1, 2 & 3 reactors have dropped since yesterday, except for Unit #3 feedwater nozzle temperature, which is unchanged.

TEPCO has acknowledged the NISA reprimand for Health Physics air and water sampling mistakes, made April 1. TEPCO has made all upgrades in sample gathering and analytical techniques. This is yet another example of the advantages of a self-regulating nuclear community. It should be noted that while NISA is a government-funded agency, it operates in a realm of relative independence from political machinations within the government itself.

In typical Japanese gestures of abeyance, the president of TEPCO and NISA have issued formal apologies to the people of Japan for the nuclear emergency at Fukushima Daiichi.

Asahi Shimbun today reports good news for some of the Fukushima evacuees. Since last Sunday, 14 chefs from such big-name eateries in Tokyo and Osaka as La Tour d'Argent and L'osier, have taken turns, in pairs, to serve french cuisine to those who have left the evacuation zone. But don't let me tell you about it, click on the link for yourself...

http://www.asahi.com/english/TKY201104090152.html

Finally, MIT published a brief explanation of how regulatory standards are set by the government. This report is based entirely on the Linear, No Threshold model used by the government. Radiation hormesis is thus not mentioned, I assume because the American government (and all other world governments) refuse to acknowledge it. Regardless, the report shows the ultra conservatism used in setting radiation and contamination standards...

http://mitnse.com/ (April 7 report)

Why don't the governments of the world use radiation hormesis to set the standards? Politics! As said here before, political decisions are predicated on what the politicos perceive as the beliefs of the majority. Since TMI, the world's public has been conditioned to believe there is no absolutely safe level of radiation exposure. Radiation hormesis entirely contradicts this belief, thus the politicians have no interest in changing anything. If they did, the perceived public uproar would be politically deafening. Counter-intuitive realities have a way of doing that. Until the actuality of radiation hormesis becomes public knowledge, governments of the world will continue to needlessly frighten their citizens with no-safe-level-based standards.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Mon Apr 11, 2011 10:52 pm

Holland helps Japan

http://www.nederlandhelptjapan.nl/?utm_source=banners_NHJ&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=xxx&placementwww.youtube.com&gclid=CITfjP3FlagCFQWDDgod0EzxCw

its in dutch but its in the ajax stadium, some dutch artists perform, and then Ajax plays a match vs Shimizu S-Pulse, a Japanese football club.

Tickets cost €5 for a noob seat probably, and €35 for a good seat.

All money goes to Japan Smile


Last edited by Bato on Mon Apr 11, 2011 11:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Mon Apr 11, 2011 11:01 pm

^yeah they need all the help they can get.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:41 am

Update, 12-Apr-2011, 0300 UTC
nuclear-meltdown-alert


Fukushima now at Chernobyl level disaster (Level 7)

(NHK) The Japanese government’s nuclear safety agency has decided to raise the crisis level of the Fukushima Daiichi power plant accident from 5 to 7, the worst on the international scale.

Each of the seven steps of the crisis scale represents a ten times increase in the severity of the incident. In other words, the disaster is now officialy 100 times worse than it was (previously at level 5, now at level 7). Many suspected this all along, but now it is official.

(KYODO) The release of a preliminary calculation Monday by the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan, said the nuclear plant was releasing up to 10,000 terabecquerels of radioactive materials per hour.

The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency made the decision on Monday. It says the damaged facilities have been releasing a massive amount of radioactive substances, which are posing a threat to human health and the environment over a wide area.

A fire broke out Tuesday morning, but was soon extinguished, the plant operator said. (no further details on the fire at this time)



Update, 12-Apr-2011, 1400 UTC

Earthquakes continue to pound the region.
Magnitude 5.4, 5.2, 6.2, 6.0, on and on… just during the past 24 hours. Structural integrity remains a concern.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Apr 13, 2011 9:01 am

I read that so far it's released 10% of what Chernobyl has. And where Chernobyl was one reactor at a 7 rating, they're summing up the status from all the reactors and giving it a 7.


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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:31 pm

Yeah Chernobyl was 100 time more powerful than the current nuclear disaster, but i wonder why they raised it from 5 to 7 Question
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:39 pm

This is crazy...

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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:53 pm

Dude i feel really sad every time i see this images, it affects me a lot, because i really love Japan, i want to move and live there.
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 13, 2011 3:56 pm

I think everyone should post videos of the disaster, i know some of you have seen videos i haven't seen.



I also wanted to add this image up.

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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Bato on Wed Apr 13, 2011 4:05 pm

GILDARTS wrote:Dude i feel really sad every time i see this images, it affects me a lot, because i really love Japan, i want to move and live there.

that women crying and saying ''i though i would die'' makes me sad Sad
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by MvRaM on Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:13 pm

Really it is, imaged all the kids that lost their parents or the parents that lost their kids, even more how many people died, and there is still many more uncounted for. I think last time i checked there was 14k to 20k dead and uncounted people..
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Re: Japanese Nuclear Crisis Situation

Post by Sporadic on Wed Apr 13, 2011 8:10 pm

GILDARTS wrote:Yeah Chernobyl was 100 time more powerful than the current nuclear disaster, but i wonder why they raised it from 5 to 7 Question

Chernobyl wasn't contained good enough. And some explosion and improper building blew away the containment vessel so when it went into meltdown there was nothing stopping the large amounts of radiation from escaping. The new provisional rating of 7 for Fukishima considers the accidents that occurred at Units 1, 2 and 3 as a single event on INES and uses estimated total radiation release to the atmosphere as a justification.

I'm impressed with those dudes who went to Chernobyl and barricaded the reactor with a concrete tomb when it went meltdown. Those poor bastards setting it up likely died afterwards since near the reactor control room it was something like 10,000 sVr


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